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Calla Lilies

Calla Lilies
Calla-Lilies

Calla lilies are a favorite for summertime gardens, parties and weddings! Calla lilies are not true lilies, but are a unique, warm-weather flower grown from rhizomes. Perfect for beds and borders, callas are famous for their elegant, trumpet-shaped flowers and attractive center seed pods. Available in a variety of colors and heights, calla lilies add something totally unique to the summer garden. These sunny, summer-blooming bulbs are a joyous addition, and make a huge impact with very little effort.

By planting large swathes of calla lily bulbs en masse, you'll create a gorgeous, informal cottage garden. Or, use calla lilies in dark tones or bright whites to add height and drama to a more elegant look. Calla lilies can be grown in containers and planters, and are adorable along water features and walkways.

Calla-Lilies Tips & Growing Instructions

tulip In frost-free areas, grow Calla Lilies in a moist, sunny to semi-shady location with soil that has been amended with a lot of organic matter. Plant the rhizomes 3" deep and 12-15" apart. Water liberally and feed monthly during the growing season. After the flowers fade, reduce the amount of water. In areas where Callas are not hardy, allow the plants to dry out. Dig the rhizomes and store in dry material for the winter. Hardy in Zones 9-11.

Why Buy Calla Lily Bulbs For Sale?

Indulge your taste for luxury with the beguiling beauty of Calla Lilies (Zantedeschia). Although not a true lily, these exquisite flowers have long been favourites of gardeners and floral designers. These summer-flowering calla lilies feature large, bell-shaped flowers with wide petals and a strong fragrance. Each large, elegant funnel-shaped bloom is formed from a single luminous, waxy petal that wraps around a spiky pistil. The arrowhead shaped leaves and long, smooth stems add to the lily's artistic appeal.

Most people think of Calla Lilies when it comes to wedding bouquets. That's because white calla lilies are said to be good luck for the wedding day. But calla lilies are quite popular in many flower arrangements and the garden. They grow well in borders, containers or even in the house as a houseplant. They come in many different colors and can be quite the attention getter in your garden or patio.
Calla lilies are a favorite for summertime gardens, parties and weddings! Calla lilies are not true lilies, but are a unique, warm-weather flower grown from rhizomes. Perfect for beds and borders, callas are famous for their elegant, trumpet-shaped flowers and attractive center seed pods. Available in a variety of colors and heights, calla lilies add something totally unique to the summer garden. These sunny, summer-blooming bulbs are a joyous addition, and make a huge impact with very little effort.
By planting large swathes of calla lily bulbs en masse, you'll create a gorgeous, informal cottage garden. Or, use calla lilies in dark tones or bright whites to add height and drama to a more elegant look. Calla lilies can be grown in containers and planters, and are adorable along water features and walkways.

How to Grow Calla Lilies

These dramatic flowers are surprisingly easy to grow. In frost-free areas, grow Calla Lilies in a moist, sunny to semi-shady location with soil that has been amended with a lot of organic matter. Plant your calla lily bulbs in the spring, 6 inches deep and 12 inches apart in loose, well-drained soil. Calla lilies thrive in full sun to part shade. Plant the rhizomes 3" deep and 12-15" apart.

Once planted, they require little maintenance other than regular watering. Water liberally and feed monthly during the growing season. After the flowers fade, reduce the amount of water. In areas where Callas are not hardy, allow the plants to dry out. Dig the rhizomes and store in dry material for the winter. Hardy in Zones 9-11. Sleek, gorgeous Calla Lily flowers bloom in mid to late summer on stems reaching from 1 to 3 feet tall. Because of their extravagant, exotic appearance, Calla lilies are striking when planted in masses by themselves.

How to Care for Calla Lilies

Calla lilies are only hardy in the ground in the warm zones 8-10. In northern cooler zones 3-7 they may require to be lifted in the winter or you can just treat them like annuals. If you are familiar with lifting dahlias you will take the same steps storing calla lilies for winter. You will need to lift them after their leaves start to turn yellow and die back. To dig them up gently lift them with your spade and try not to cut into the rhizome. Lift them out of the ground and shake off all the soil on the rhizome.

You can store your calla lilies in a vented cardboard box or a paper bag. Place them in the box and add peat moss, vermiculite or wrap them in newspaper. Store them in a dark cool place around 50°F. Check to make sure they are not molding throughout the winter. Once spring arrives and no chances of frost, replant them in your desired space. If they have mold or are too soft and wilted, you may need to buy new rhizomes. Breck's will offer calla lilies each spring. They will ship in the spring at the right time to plant for your zone.

How to Help Calla Lilies Look their Best

Some gardeners create stunning backdrops by planting calla lilies behind shorter flowers, giving their beds a tropical look. Because calla lilies flower in so many brilliant colours, there is a variety to complement almost any landscaping scheme. White calla lilies are a perfect accompaniment to black-eyed Susans or other taller summer flowers, while red calla lilies look magnificent placed amongst or near black callas and daisies. Their splendid, sweeping curves add a note of luxury wherever they appear.

Choose from these superb calla lily bulbs for sale and bring elegance and artistry to your own home or garden with their graceful, lavish splendor!

Where is the best place to plant calla lilies?

Calla lilies prefer full sun or partial shade-you'll see their best blooms if they receive six or more hours of sunlight each day-and moist, well-draining soil. Remember that callas are, in fact, tropical plants, so think "tropics" when creating a space for these in your garden or on the patio. Callas are beautifully suited for planting in drifts, along walkways or structures, or in long planters. These flowers also make excellent additions to aquatic areas, and will thrive alongside ponds or water features. Remember that most varieties prefer to be spaced about one foot apart. Calla lilies grow short roots, and like a bit of air flow between them.

Do calla lilies need full sun or shade?

Calla lilies are full-sun bulbs, but they can handle a few hours of shade, especially in warmer weather. For best results, make sure your calla lilies receive at least six hours of sun each day. In very hot climates, calla lilies may perform best when kept out of the hottest afternoon sun, so consider planting them in an area that's shaded at the hottest point of the day.

Is a calla lily an indoor or outdoor plant?

Calla lilies can be grown indoors or outdoors! While these plants are often sold as outdoor, summer-blooming bulbs, you can grow calla lilies inside under the right conditions.
To grow calla lilies indoors, plant them in spring, just as you would with outdoor plants. Water them and fertilize monthly, all while keeping your calla lilies in a warm, sunny window. You'll be rewarded with blooms from spring through fall! When winter rolls around, your lilies will likely die back. Cease watering, and store the pots in a cool location until the following spring. You may wish to repot your calla lilies in springtime, and you should begin watering again as the growing season starts.

  • Do calla lilies come back every year?
  • Calla lilies are perennials that happily grow outdoors in summer across the United States. However, calla lilies are only winter-hardy in Zones 8 through 10. If your region freezes over winter, you'll need to overwinter your calla lilies indoors to ensure that they'll come back.
    Luckily, overwintering calla lilies is a simple proposition. If you're growing calla lilies in containers, you can simply move those containers indoors for the duration of the winter. Store them in a cool and dry place. For outdoor calla lilies, allow the plants to die back, then snip them to the ground in fall. Once frost hits, lift the rhizomes out of the ground, and store them in a cool, dry location until spring. Then, you'll replant and start over again.

    See more tips for how to care for calla lilies in our How-To Garden Library.

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